Decide On Assange

Is Julian Assange
worthy of your
Senate vote?
This website is neither for or against Julian Assange and is not affiliated with Wikileaks or any other political party.
To help you Decide on Assange, we have gathered several arguments, or Belief Bytes, for and against his run for the Senate. You’ll need to decide if you agree or disagree with each Belief Byte based on its supporting evidence.
In an attempt to control bias, the Belief Bytes and the order you view them will be randomly selected from an evolving collection of curated and crowd-sourced contributions.
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BeliefBytes

The WikiLeaks Party brings new ideas and real people - not politicians - to the Senate.

None of the WikiLeaks Party Senate candidates have held public office before. That's a good thing. They are Australians with real jobs: professionals, workers, and activists. They have worked as: diplomats, social scientists, environmentalists, Indigenous education consultants, community activists and feminist scholars. It's time real Australians - who haven't been caught up in party politics - got back into our government. The Senate is a great place to start.

Some of the personal details of the WikiLeaks Party candidates can be found on the WikiLeaks party website. The Australian Media has had little to say about the candidates, but this report from New Zealand backs up some of the claims the party makes on its website.

The only ex-politician attached to the WikiLeaks Party is their Campaign Manager, Greg Barns. He used to be a candidate for the Liberal Party (Tasmania) before falling out with PM John Howard overAsylum seeker policy, and the culture of the ALP in general. His still publishes his views on political issues quite frequently.

Not even Wikileaks Party members trust their own politics, how can everyday Australians?

Julian Assange's Victorian Senate running mate, Leslie Cannold, recently quit the WikiLeaks Party, complaining of power struggles, white-anting and a failure to live up to its democratic ideals.

Leslie Cannold announced on Wednesday the 21st of August that she was resigning as the party's second Victorian Senate candidate.

Her resignation came after it was reported that the WikiLeaks Party had directed its preferences to right-wing parties; the Shooters and Fishers Party and the white nationalist Australia First Party. Both parties are now preferencing ahead of the Australian Labor Party, The Liberal Party of Australia and the Greens in the Wikileaks Party's NSW Senate race.

In her resignation statement on Wednesday, Leslie Cannold hit out at the failure to lodge Senate preference forms in WA and NSW in line with the National Council's instructions, stating “This is an unacceptable mode of operation for any organisation but even more so for an organisation explicitly committed to democracy, transparency and accountability.”

Assange empowers those in need - it’s time we allowed him to stand up for us Australians.

Because of WikiLeaks the people of Kenya learned that their government was carrying out extra-judicial killings and stealing billions of dollars of public money. The people of Iceland also learned the details of a banking scandal that their media were forbidden to report.

In late 2008, WikiLeaks published a local NGO report on Kenyan Human Rights abuses. This had previously been difficult as the report detailed Kenyan police murdering Kenyan citizens. Later, the local authors who contributed to its content (Oscar Kamau Kingara, and John Paul Oul) were assassinated in Nairobi two weeks after they presented their findings to the government in 2009.

WikiLeaks also published a leaked report on financial corruption in Kenya that appeared to be from the accounting firm, Kroll. The report detailed how members of Kenya's previous government stole billions of dollars of public money. ‘The looting of Kenya’ became a major news story both in Kenya and worldwide, and may have affected the Kenyan elections in 2007. Questions about the report's authenticity and its merit are disputed, but major media published stories imply it was authentic.

In 2009, an Icelandic news channel reported that although they had a story about possible fraud at a major Icelandic bank, the government censored them. To get around the censorship, the news channel filled the allotted airtime with a static shot of the WikiLeaks.org logo. At the time, the site featured leaked documents detailing the Icelandic bank's corruption. The Icelandic government soon lifted the gag order and bankers were imprisoned for their crimes.

Assange's participation in Parliament constitutes a contradiction of his - and WikiLeaks' - anarchistic politics.

Assange is (or at least, at one point, explicitly identified as) a political anarchist. He argues that government and the state operate on a foundation of lies and secrets - what he calls ‘conspiratorial government’ - that leaking can help to undermine and reveal. This is also the principled basis upon which WikiLeaks is founded.

Anarchism is not - as popular opinion, or the media, would have us believe - merely the pursuit of ‘chaos’ and ‘disorder’, but a sophisticated ideology premised on opposition to externally imposed hierarchy. One of its most famous adherent, Pytor Kropotkin, describes it as “the name given to a principle or theory of life and conduct under which society is conceived without government - harmony in such a society being obtained, not by submission to law, or by obedience to any authority, but by free agreements concluded between the various groups, territorial and professional, freely constituted for the sake of production and consumption, as also for the satisfaction of the infinite variety of needs and aspirations of a civilized being.”

This is the social vision that motivates Assange, and provides the inspiration for WikiLeaks. Assange describes ‘transparency activism’ as WikiLeaks' operational principle, claiming the organisation's modus operandi is to “get out suppressed information into the public.” This aim of ‘setting information free’ has an explicitly anarchist political aim: to undermine the capacity of what Assange calls ‘conspiratorial government’ to keep secrets. Through the use of new technologies - especially computers, encryption technologies, and the Internet - WikiLeaks has positioned itself to undermine the capacity of the state to maintain conspiracies. As Assange told Time in 2010, when deceptive organisations are placed under public scrutiny, they can either “reform in such a way that they can be proud of their endeavours, and proud to display them to the public”, or they can “lock down internally and balkanize, and as a result of course, cease to be as efficient, open and honest, or the can be closed, conspiratorial and inefficient”. WikiLeaks aims to ‘split’ these conspiracies by “eliminating important communication channels”. By revealing secrets through leaks, hierarchical organisations are less able to conspire. Leaks thus help to “carry us through the mire of politically distorted language and into a position of clarity”, with the hope of inspiring citizens towards “a course of ennobling and effective action.”

In participating in the upcoming Federal elections, WikiLeaks - and Assange himself - is fundamentally contradicting its ideological and operational principles. Perhaps they can bring more transparency and accountability to state institutions. But to do so by participating in the hierarchical structures they condemn, and which produce such barbarism as they've been set up to reveal, seems contradictory. Assange's reflections on ‘conspiratorial government’ (written when he participated in the ‘Hacktivist’ movement) can be found here.