Decide On Assange

Is Julian Assange
worthy of your
Senate vote?
This website is neither for or against Julian Assange and is not affiliated with Wikileaks or any other political party.
To help you Decide on Assange, we have gathered several arguments, or Belief Bytes, for and against his run for the Senate. You’ll need to decide if you agree or disagree with each Belief Byte based on its supporting evidence.
In an attempt to control bias, the Belief Bytes and the order you view them will be randomly selected from an evolving collection of curated and crowd-sourced contributions.
Start Deciding
BeliefBytes

Assange empowers those in need - it’s time we allowed him to stand up for us Australians.

Because of WikiLeaks the people of Kenya learned that their government was carrying out extra-judicial killings and stealing billions of dollars of public money. The people of Iceland also learned the details of a banking scandal that their media were forbidden to report.

In late 2008, WikiLeaks published a local NGO report on Kenyan Human Rights abuses. This had previously been difficult as the report detailed Kenyan police murdering Kenyan citizens. Later, the local authors who contributed to its content (Oscar Kamau Kingara, and John Paul Oul) were assassinated in Nairobi two weeks after they presented their findings to the government in 2009.

WikiLeaks also published a leaked report on financial corruption in Kenya that appeared to be from the accounting firm, Kroll. The report detailed how members of Kenya's previous government stole billions of dollars of public money. ‘The looting of Kenya’ became a major news story both in Kenya and worldwide, and may have affected the Kenyan elections in 2007. Questions about the report's authenticity and its merit are disputed, but major media published stories imply it was authentic.

In 2009, an Icelandic news channel reported that although they had a story about possible fraud at a major Icelandic bank, the government censored them. To get around the censorship, the news channel filled the allotted airtime with a static shot of the WikiLeaks.org logo. At the time, the site featured leaked documents detailing the Icelandic bank's corruption. The Icelandic government soon lifted the gag order and bankers were imprisoned for their crimes.

Accusations of Assange raping women in Sweden must be cleared before he stands in our Senate.

Swedish police requested the arrest of Assange in their preliminary investigation into a criminal complaint of rape. Although he has not yet been charged, two women were interviewed by Swedish police and Assange faces ‘possible prosecution’ from their testimony.

While it is important to note that Swedish officials have not yet charged Assange with a crime, the Wikileaks founder is refusing to return to Sweden and answer questions regarding the issue.

Specifically, the Swedes stated that “requesting the arrest of Assange is in order to enable implementation of the preliminary investigation and possible prosecution”.

The possible prosecution stems from the reports of two women who contacted Swedish Police and described situations that constitute rape under Swedish law. The interviews that these women gave to Swedish police suggest that they were involved in rough sexual encounters that escalated to acts that they did not previously consent to (including penetration). Further, they were unsure whether Assange stopped specific acts (penetration without a condom) when they asked him to. A full translation of these interviews is available online, or if you prefer you can read the original Swedish.

Assange is not afraid to speak ‘truth to power’ - we need that more than ever in the Senate.

Assange has published facts about powerful entities without concern for his personal safety. Further, the documents that Assange has leaked have made corporate and state powers more accountable for their previous actions. He wants the ‘default setting’ for government information and power to be open and accessible. He claims he will take these ideas and apply them to the Senate.

When WikiLeaks launched in 2006 it justified publishing leaks because “documents pertaining to large public institutions, such as governments and corporations, should presumptively be available to the public. The burden is on a government or corporation to argue that a document should be kept secret.”

Assange despises any organisations that create secrets. He believes “governments and corporations are by their nature secretive” and this will inevitably take power away from the people.

The Wikileaks founder has attempted to ‘speak truth to power’ by publishing numerous documents through WikiLeaks.org and in the mainstream media (The New York Times, The Guardian etc.). While the success of this is debatable, one example shows how it worked: The New York Times Newspaper relied on WikiLeaks data for news stories in over 50 of the first 100 days of 2011.

The WikiLeaks party claims its aim is to “restore genuine independent scrutiny into our political process.” That aim is not detailed with specific policy on their website, other than to say, if elected, they will “demand thorough transparency [of the government's] contractual arrangements with private companies.”

However, the party also promises to: “push for radical change in media policy to increase Australian media innovation…demand that all information on data seizure and storage of citizens by government agencies and allied corporations be made public…expose the collusions between the Australian state and the military-industrial complex…ensure Australia stands tall as a responsible global citizen…and protect whistleblowers.”

Assange shows no concern for national security and the rule of law - a senator must respect those.

We can debate whether Julian Assange has strengthened democracy, but the facts prove that he has broken laws, disregarded governments, and prefers anarchy to order. Assange admitted to crimes as a hacker, defied the rule of law in England, and decides for himself what should be secret - instead of honouring what elected governments decide.

In the 1990s, Assange called himself “Mendax” when breaking into computer networks. He was arrested in 1995 and pled guilty to 25 charges after 6 were dropped. The judge who sentenced Julian Assange noted that he believed Assange had hacked into computer systems out of curiosity and to empower himself, rather than personal gain. The judge warned that if Assange had not had such a disrupted childhood, he would have been imprisoned for up to 10 years.

Assange is currently defying British and Swedish law. While it is important to note that Assange has not yet been charged with a crime by Swedish officials, he is hiding from an Interpol extradition request to arrest him in Sweden. Specifically, the Swedes stated that they were “requesting the arrest of Assange in order to enable implementation of the preliminary investigation and possible prosecution.” Assange's legal team argued that the request was not enough for extradition to Sweden. The Swedes felt that because Julian Assange's “surrender is sought in order that he may be subject to criminal proceedings”, he should be extradited.

The British Judge for Assange’s case ruled that “there is an unequivocal statement that the purpose of the warrant is for prosecution”, and that, despite other concerns that were raised but not substantiated, Assange should be sent to Sweden. Assange appealed to higher court and lost. After losing the appeal, he sought asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London – in defiance of British law.

It is important to communicate that the criminal complaints against Assange concern rape. Specifically, two women contacted Swedish Police and described situations that constitute rape under Swedish law. The interviews that these victims gave to Swedish police suggest that they were involved in rough sexual encounters that escalated to acts that they did not previously consent to (including penetration). Further, they were unsure whether Assange stopped specific acts (penetration without a condom) when they asked him to. A full translation of these interviews is available online, or if you prefer you can read the original Swedish.