Decide On Assange

Is Julian Assange
worthy of your
Senate vote?
This website is neither for or against Julian Assange and is not affiliated with Wikileaks or any other political party.
To help you Decide on Assange, we have gathered several arguments, or Belief Bytes, for and against his run for the Senate. You’ll need to decide if you agree or disagree with each Belief Byte based on its supporting evidence.
In an attempt to control bias, the Belief Bytes and the order you view them will be randomly selected from an evolving collection of curated and crowd-sourced contributions.
Start Deciding
BeliefBytes

The Guardian, not Assange, enabled the release of uncensored US Cables. Assange is neither reckless nor dangerous.

Initially, WikiLeaks and major worldwide newspapers carefully redacted personal information from the US State Department cables before publishing only a fraction of them. For several months, newspapers published stories at a reasonable pace that allowed them to redact and release cables with WikiLeaks' help. However, an unfortunate chain of events involving Guardian journalists left the entire un-redacted database of cables exposed online. He wasn't reckless in WikiLeaks, he won't be in the Senate.

Beginning 28 November 2010, The Guardian, The New York Times, El Pais, Der Spiegel and Le Monde worked with Wikileaks to minimise any harm to people mentioned in the cables (by deleting informants names etc.). Months later, an unfortunate chain of events resulted in two Guardian journalists unwittingly publishing the password for an encrypted file available online that contained all the unredacted cables. How all the cables became published in an unredacted form is disputed. The full explanation from WikiLeaks can be found here, while the Guardian's account is here.

Aware that foreign intelligence services could now find and use the unredacted cables to harm people, but ordinary people could still not read them, Assange decided to publish all of the cables without redaction. The cables were quickly mirrored across the Internet in a form easily searchable by anyone with an Internet connection. While WikiLeaks blamed The Guardian, The Guardian denied any wrong doing and pointed to former WikiLeaks employees who may have had a part in ‘leaking’ the entire volume of cables.

Accusations of Assange raping women in Sweden must be cleared before he stands in our Senate.

Swedish police requested the arrest of Assange in their preliminary investigation into a criminal complaint of rape. Although he has not yet been charged, two women were interviewed by Swedish police and Assange faces ‘possible prosecution’ from their testimony.

While it is important to note that Swedish officials have not yet charged Assange with a crime, the Wikileaks founder is refusing to return to Sweden and answer questions regarding the issue.

Specifically, the Swedes stated that “requesting the arrest of Assange is in order to enable implementation of the preliminary investigation and possible prosecution”.

The possible prosecution stems from the reports of two women who contacted Swedish Police and described situations that constitute rape under Swedish law. The interviews that these women gave to Swedish police suggest that they were involved in rough sexual encounters that escalated to acts that they did not previously consent to (including penetration). Further, they were unsure whether Assange stopped specific acts (penetration without a condom) when they asked him to. A full translation of these interviews is available online, or if you prefer you can read the original Swedish.

Assange is not afraid to speak ‘truth to power’ - we need that more than ever in the Senate.

Assange has published facts about powerful entities without concern for his personal safety. Further, the documents that Assange has leaked have made corporate and state powers more accountable for their previous actions. He wants the ‘default setting’ for government information and power to be open and accessible. He claims he will take these ideas and apply them to the Senate.

When WikiLeaks launched in 2006 it justified publishing leaks because “documents pertaining to large public institutions, such as governments and corporations, should presumptively be available to the public. The burden is on a government or corporation to argue that a document should be kept secret.”

Assange despises any organisations that create secrets. He believes “governments and corporations are by their nature secretive” and this will inevitably take power away from the people.

The Wikileaks founder has attempted to ‘speak truth to power’ by publishing numerous documents through WikiLeaks.org and in the mainstream media (The New York Times, The Guardian etc.). While the success of this is debatable, one example shows how it worked: The New York Times Newspaper relied on WikiLeaks data for news stories in over 50 of the first 100 days of 2011.

The WikiLeaks party claims its aim is to “restore genuine independent scrutiny into our political process.” That aim is not detailed with specific policy on their website, other than to say, if elected, they will “demand thorough transparency [of the government's] contractual arrangements with private companies.”

However, the party also promises to: “push for radical change in media policy to increase Australian media innovation…demand that all information on data seizure and storage of citizens by government agencies and allied corporations be made public…expose the collusions between the Australian state and the military-industrial complex…ensure Australia stands tall as a responsible global citizen…and protect whistleblowers.”

Not even Wikileaks Party members trust their own politics, how can everyday Australians?

Julian Assange's Victorian Senate running mate, Leslie Cannold, recently quit the WikiLeaks Party, complaining of power struggles, white-anting and a failure to live up to its democratic ideals.

Leslie Cannold announced on Wednesday the 21st of August that she was resigning as the party's second Victorian Senate candidate.

Her resignation came after it was reported that the WikiLeaks Party had directed its preferences to right-wing parties; the Shooters and Fishers Party and the white nationalist Australia First Party. Both parties are now preferencing ahead of the Australian Labor Party, The Liberal Party of Australia and the Greens in the Wikileaks Party's NSW Senate race.

In her resignation statement on Wednesday, Leslie Cannold hit out at the failure to lodge Senate preference forms in WA and NSW in line with the National Council's instructions, stating “This is an unacceptable mode of operation for any organisation but even more so for an organisation explicitly committed to democracy, transparency and accountability.”