Decide On Assange

Is Julian Assange
worthy of your
Senate vote?
This website is neither for or against Julian Assange and is not affiliated with Wikileaks or any other political party.
To help you Decide on Assange, we have gathered several arguments, or Belief Bytes, for and against his run for the Senate. You’ll need to decide if you agree or disagree with each Belief Byte based on its supporting evidence.
In an attempt to control bias, the Belief Bytes and the order you view them will be randomly selected from an evolving collection of curated and crowd-sourced contributions.
Start Deciding
BeliefBytes

Assange has catalogued the real cost of war to help lead towards peace. That's the kind of accounting our Senate needs.

The Afghan and Iraqi ‘warlogs’ that WikiLeaks leaked created new clarity for the events of those wars. American citizens were shown a more accurate view of the expense of war in both financial and human losses. It's time Australia deployed the same idea of accountability in its own Senate.

Although the ‘warlogs’ were reported on by various media agencies around the world the utility of that kind of information continues to be explored. However, independent researchers recently used the Iraq ‘warlogs’ to show that the public reporting of deaths probably missed around 60% of the casualties that are confidentially recorded by the US army. Wikipedia is a decent place to start understanding if these documents changed public perceptions of war and if they caused harm for locals or soldiers.

Not even Wikileaks Party members trust their own politics, how can everyday Australians?

Julian Assange's Victorian Senate running mate, Leslie Cannold, recently quit the WikiLeaks Party, complaining of power struggles, white-anting and a failure to live up to its democratic ideals.

Leslie Cannold announced on Wednesday the 21st of August that she was resigning as the party's second Victorian Senate candidate.

Her resignation came after it was reported that the WikiLeaks Party had directed its preferences to right-wing parties; the Shooters and Fishers Party and the white nationalist Australia First Party. Both parties are now preferencing ahead of the Australian Labor Party, The Liberal Party of Australia and the Greens in the Wikileaks Party's NSW Senate race.

In her resignation statement on Wednesday, Leslie Cannold hit out at the failure to lodge Senate preference forms in WA and NSW in line with the National Council's instructions, stating “This is an unacceptable mode of operation for any organisation but even more so for an organisation explicitly committed to democracy, transparency and accountability.”

The WikiLeaks Party brings new ideas and real people - not politicians - to the Senate.

None of the WikiLeaks Party Senate candidates have held public office before. That's a good thing. They are Australians with real jobs: professionals, workers, and activists. They have worked as: diplomats, social scientists, environmentalists, Indigenous education consultants, community activists and feminist scholars. It's time real Australians - who haven't been caught up in party politics - got back into our government. The Senate is a great place to start.

Some of the personal details of the WikiLeaks Party candidates can be found on the WikiLeaks party website. The Australian Media has had little to say about the candidates, but this report from New Zealand backs up some of the claims the party makes on its website.

The only ex-politician attached to the WikiLeaks Party is their Campaign Manager, Greg Barns. He used to be a candidate for the Liberal Party (Tasmania) before falling out with PM John Howard overAsylum seeker policy, and the culture of the ALP in general. His still publishes his views on political issues quite frequently.

Assange shows no concern for national security and the rule of law - a senator must respect those.

We can debate whether Julian Assange has strengthened democracy, but the facts prove that he has broken laws, disregarded governments, and prefers anarchy to order. Assange admitted to crimes as a hacker, defied the rule of law in England, and decides for himself what should be secret - instead of honouring what elected governments decide.

In the 1990s, Assange called himself “Mendax” when breaking into computer networks. He was arrested in 1995 and pled guilty to 25 charges after 6 were dropped. The judge who sentenced Julian Assange noted that he believed Assange had hacked into computer systems out of curiosity and to empower himself, rather than personal gain. The judge warned that if Assange had not had such a disrupted childhood, he would have been imprisoned for up to 10 years.

Assange is currently defying British and Swedish law. While it is important to note that Assange has not yet been charged with a crime by Swedish officials, he is hiding from an Interpol extradition request to arrest him in Sweden. Specifically, the Swedes stated that they were “requesting the arrest of Assange in order to enable implementation of the preliminary investigation and possible prosecution.” Assange's legal team argued that the request was not enough for extradition to Sweden. The Swedes felt that because Julian Assange's “surrender is sought in order that he may be subject to criminal proceedings”, he should be extradited.

The British Judge for Assange’s case ruled that “there is an unequivocal statement that the purpose of the warrant is for prosecution”, and that, despite other concerns that were raised but not substantiated, Assange should be sent to Sweden. Assange appealed to higher court and lost. After losing the appeal, he sought asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London – in defiance of British law.

It is important to communicate that the criminal complaints against Assange concern rape. Specifically, two women contacted Swedish Police and described situations that constitute rape under Swedish law. The interviews that these victims gave to Swedish police suggest that they were involved in rough sexual encounters that escalated to acts that they did not previously consent to (including penetration). Further, they were unsure whether Assange stopped specific acts (penetration without a condom) when they asked him to. A full translation of these interviews is available online, or if you prefer you can read the original Swedish.