Decide On Assange

Is Julian Assange
worthy of your
Senate vote?
This website is neither for or against Julian Assange and is not affiliated with Wikileaks or any other political party.
To help you Decide on Assange, we have gathered several arguments, or Belief Bytes, for and against his run for the Senate. You’ll need to decide if you agree or disagree with each Belief Byte based on its supporting evidence.
In an attempt to control bias, the Belief Bytes and the order you view them will be randomly selected from an evolving collection of curated and crowd-sourced contributions.
Start Deciding
BeliefBytes

Assange has catalogued the real cost of war to help lead towards peace. That's the kind of accounting our Senate needs.

The Afghan and Iraqi ‘warlogs’ that WikiLeaks leaked created new clarity for the events of those wars. American citizens were shown a more accurate view of the expense of war in both financial and human losses. It's time Australia deployed the same idea of accountability in its own Senate.

Although the ‘warlogs’ were reported on by various media agencies around the world the utility of that kind of information continues to be explored. However, independent researchers recently used the Iraq ‘warlogs’ to show that the public reporting of deaths probably missed around 60% of the casualties that are confidentially recorded by the US army. Wikipedia is a decent place to start understanding if these documents changed public perceptions of war and if they caused harm for locals or soldiers.

Accusations of Assange raping women in Sweden must be cleared before he stands in our Senate.

Swedish police requested the arrest of Assange in their preliminary investigation into a criminal complaint of rape. Although he has not yet been charged, two women were interviewed by Swedish police and Assange faces ‘possible prosecution’ from their testimony.

While it is important to note that Swedish officials have not yet charged Assange with a crime, the Wikileaks founder is refusing to return to Sweden and answer questions regarding the issue.

Specifically, the Swedes stated that “requesting the arrest of Assange is in order to enable implementation of the preliminary investigation and possible prosecution”.

The possible prosecution stems from the reports of two women who contacted Swedish Police and described situations that constitute rape under Swedish law. The interviews that these women gave to Swedish police suggest that they were involved in rough sexual encounters that escalated to acts that they did not previously consent to (including penetration). Further, they were unsure whether Assange stopped specific acts (penetration without a condom) when they asked him to. A full translation of these interviews is available online, or if you prefer you can read the original Swedish.

Assange empowers those in need - it’s time we allowed him to stand up for us Australians.

Because of WikiLeaks the people of Kenya learned that their government was carrying out extra-judicial killings and stealing billions of dollars of public money. The people of Iceland also learned the details of a banking scandal that their media were forbidden to report.

In late 2008, WikiLeaks published a local NGO report on Kenyan Human Rights abuses. This had previously been difficult as the report detailed Kenyan police murdering Kenyan citizens. Later, the local authors who contributed to its content (Oscar Kamau Kingara, and John Paul Oul) were assassinated in Nairobi two weeks after they presented their findings to the government in 2009.

WikiLeaks also published a leaked report on financial corruption in Kenya that appeared to be from the accounting firm, Kroll. The report detailed how members of Kenya's previous government stole billions of dollars of public money. ‘The looting of Kenya’ became a major news story both in Kenya and worldwide, and may have affected the Kenyan elections in 2007. Questions about the report's authenticity and its merit are disputed, but major media published stories imply it was authentic.

In 2009, an Icelandic news channel reported that although they had a story about possible fraud at a major Icelandic bank, the government censored them. To get around the censorship, the news channel filled the allotted airtime with a static shot of the WikiLeaks.org logo. At the time, the site featured leaked documents detailing the Icelandic bank's corruption. The Icelandic government soon lifted the gag order and bankers were imprisoned for their crimes.

Like all politicians, Assange is power hungry. Even if WikiLeaks was a good idea, Assange in the Senate is not.

With WikiLeaks, Assange tried to create a radical publishing mechanism for greater government and corporate transparency. However, his need for credit and control has hurt the WikiLeaks project and the ideals behind it. Now he's using the goodwill associated with WikiLeaks to help fight his personal legal problems in Sweden - that's not transparent or right. There's good reason to expect these patterns to continue if he is elected to the Senate.

With regard to using the Senate bid to escape his legal problems, Assange has stated that “Australians won't swallow” him being extradited to Sweden or the U.S if he becomes elected. Meanwhile, since Assange has been in the Ecuadorian Embassy, WikiLeaks has not publicly accepted any new documents for publication.

Assange's past behaviour has led to severe disagreements with many of his colleagues. Journalists of The Guardian, The New York Times, and his former associate Daniel Domscheit-Berg have all publicly renounced Assange.

One of the first members of WikiLeaks was Daniel Domscheit-Berg. In his book, Domscheit-Berg describes Assange's self-centered idea of leadership and refers to an occasion when the ex-hacker insisted Wikileaks staff members ‘not question leadership [Assange] in times of crisis’ (p. 160, 200). Daniel Domscheit-Berg was eventually sacked for insubordination.

The Guardian journalists who helped Assange publish WikiLeaks data also had a falling out with him. In their account, he backtracked on publication exclusivity when things weren't going according to his plan. Their public treatment of Assange has been decidedly negative ever since.

While he worked with Assange, the executive editor of The New York Times, Bill Keller, consistently wrote about the troubles he encountered with the Wikileaks founder. Times columnists also wrote that people were abandoning Assange because of his “erratic and imperious behaviour, and a nearly delusional grandeur unmatched by an awareness that the digital secrets he reveals can have a price in flesh and blood.” Later, Keller summarised that Assange was “elusive, manipulative and volatile (and ultimately openly hostile to The Times and The Guardian).”

For this Belief Byte, it's important to note these quotes only show one side of a very complex story. Robert Manne and Alex Gibney comment on details about Assange's character in a working environment, and how that affects activities around him, here. While WikiLeaks offers its own version of these events here.